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Eller College Home > Faculty and Research > Research Buzz > Knowledge Does Not Necessarily...

Research Buzz

Jayait Sinha

Keywords:

  • marketing
  • accessibility experiences
  • phenomenological experience
  • role of knowledge on accessibility experiences

 

Knowledge Does Not Necessarily Make the Heart Grow Fonder

The Moderating Role of Knowledge on Accessibility Experiences

Accessibility experiences have been a subject of interest since Tversky and Kahneman (1973) published their account of the availability heuristic - specifically, individuals often utilize the phenomenological experience of ease or difficulty of recall in constructing a judgment (Schwarz, 1998).

The reported studies contribute further to work in this area by examining the moderating role of knowledge on accessibility experiences and their use in evaluative judgments. The authors argue that knowledgeable individuals are more likely to experience interference effects in early stages of recall. This would result in a reversal of the usual phenomenon such that while low knowledge individuals would find recalling larger sets effortful, which would lead them to form more negative evaluations when recalling larger amounts of information, high knowledge individuals would find recalling smaller sets effortful and would form more negative evaluations when recalling smaller amounts of information. The authors discuss potential explanations and draw attention to the distinction between generating a response and the appropriateness of the response in accessibility experiences.

Authors

Jayati Sinha is an assistant professor of marketing at the Eller College of Management, University of Arizona. Dhananjay Nayakankuppam is an Associate Professor of Marketing at the Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa.

Publication Source

Published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology.

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